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How Adobe Could Take Over Design (Again)

Adobe’s Creative Cloud is an ecosystem waiting to rain on everyone.

Designers (and pigeonholing them into a single group is already tantamount to imprisoning them in Abu Ghraib) are a notoriously cliquish bunch who have a guttural reaction to  LinkedIn, Facebook, etc. where their 7AM lattes come back up their throats. Pinterest (for inspiration) and Deviantart (for gloating) are okay. But their activities around the “job” of design can’t be socialized as easily to pull faithful creative types away from their Photoshop layers and Bezier curves. Cat videos are an exception. Read more

25 Questions to Assess Your SaaS Marketing Strategy

  1. Have you explored your business model? Is it set?
  2. What is your current cost per acquisition and what should it be?
  3. What is the most valuable thing your company provides its customers? (Try not to answer with a feature, but a human benefit)
  4. Why is your solution the best choice over other choices?
  5. What are those other choices?
  6. True/False: When most people try your solution, they want to use it, but do not want to pay.
  7. If you offer a trial, how many days from trial do you see abandonment?
  8. Do you have a nurturing system in place for trial and paid users? How is it implemented?
  9. Do you have a marketing automation system?
  10. Do you have a CRM?
  11. How large is your current user base?
  12. How much revenue do you have in a month?
  13. What is more important: Adding users or adding usage?
  14. Who is your biggest customer and how do they use it?
  15. Do you have writers on staff?
  16. Do you have designers on staff?
  17. Do you have social marketers on staff?
  18. What campaigns have worked for you in the past? Do they have a shelf life?
  19. Are there any interesting use cases (either by current users or yourself)?
  20. Of paying customers, what is the churn rate?
  21. What are the main reasons people leave even after paying?
  22. How many new visitors do you get each month to your website?
  23. What is your visit-to-trial rate?
  24. Does your company have character?
  25. Are your customers willing to go on record to support you?

Based on these answers, you can start to formulate a strategy and plan. Without this information, the idea of coming up with any kind of marketing plan becomes problematic. The reason is that every plan should fit the scalability of an organization. You can say all you want that you need/expect explosive growth, but there has to be a basis for what that means.

Now you might get lucky and simply “get” your market and customers and don’t need to do this level of marketing to understand how to grow your business. But then everything should be great, right?

Services versus Products and Stuff in between

For software entrepreneurs, there is an epic struggle as to whether software is a service or a product. To the untrained user eye, it’s a product with the expectation of service.

I have a theory. Software applications are for all intents and purposes automated processes. They perform information “work” in much the same way a power saw simplifies cutting. That said, information changes, so the machinery has to change with it. Well, until software writes itself, you need a human to change the applications. If the application comes from a vendor, this is the service part.

So this introduces several challenges. You now have a software lifecycle that churns out bug fixes, patches, and feature updates. You may also face implementation needs such as integration, data migration, etc. that are unique to every customer.

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